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“He has everything we are looking for, he’s got an offer, can he come now?” asked a Division One coach about a prospect who had just started working with PPI. “Well coach, unfortunately he hadn’t submitted his information to NCAA Clearinghouse, but we made sure he sent it straight away. We advise all our prospects that this is as important as playing. We will let you know when he’s cleared,” PPI replied.

Every college football coach in America knows a story like this. They see a prospect play and know immediately that he’s a difference maker on the field for them. Then they meet the kid, they like his personality; his coach vouches for his work ethic. All are headed in the right direction, but one of the most important aspects hadn’t been checked yet. Will he be eligible?

The NCAA’s extensive eligibility rules are confusing even for American players. For international prospects, these rules are even more difficult to learn about. At PPI, we understand that we can only help someone earn a scholarship if they are going to be eligible as per the NCAA’s requirements. So it only felt fitting to kick off Chalk Talk discussing the process that enables one to chase his or her dreams.

The term college football has the word “college” in front of “football” for a reason — the school comes before the football, both in reality and syntax. Putting the current debate aside about whether college football players are amateurs or not, the reality is there are prerequisites that MUST be met in order to be declared eligible to play and receive a scholarship by the NCAA — both academic and a declaration of amateurism.

The NCAA Clearinghouse requires all Division One prospects to pass a certain amount of core courses and to meet a sliding scale of GPA combined with test scores (SAT/ACT). Note that these requirements are the floor, not the ceiling to being able to play at your dream school — meaning that a university can have higher requirements to be admitted to their institution than the NCAA’s minimum thresholds.

For foreign prospects there is even more paperwork and red tape that the prospects need to complete. If English is your second language, then you will be required to take what is known as the TOEFL test. The amateurism aspect is also going to be a longer process for foreign prospects, because some players will play in leagues where some players are paid — which may require a waiver by your club to be sent to the NCAA. **DO NOT ACCEPT ANY MONEY FOR PLAYING, as you will lose your amateur status by the NCAA***

So what does all this mean? GET OUT IN FRONT OF THE PROCESS!! There are thousands of prospects for coaches to choose from. “The best ability is dependability,” and you can’t be dependable if you are ineligible to play.

—-

Watch PPI’s website to stay up to date on NCAA eligibility. All PPI members receive personalized guidance on their eligibility application process.

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Clearance Count$

ncaa

“He has everything we are looking for, he’s got an offer, can he come now?” asked a Division One coach about a prospect who had just started working with PPI. “Well coach, unfortunately he hadn’t submitted his information to NCAA Clearinghouse, but we made sure he sent it straight away. We advise all our prospects that this is as important as playing. We will let you know when he’s cleared,” PPI replied.

Every college football coach in America knows a story like this. They see a prospect play and know immediately that he’s a difference maker on the field for them. Then they meet the kid, they like his personality; his coach vouches for his work ethic. All are headed in the right direction, but one of the most important aspects hadn’t been checked yet. Will he be eligible?

The NCAA’s extensive eligibility rules are confusing even for American players. For international prospects, these rules are even more difficult to learn about. At PPI, we understand that we can only help someone earn a scholarship if they are going to be eligible as per the NCAA’s requirements. So it only felt fitting to kick off Chalk Talk discussing the process that enables one to chase his or her dreams.

The term college football has the word “college” in front of “football” for a reason — the school comes before the football, both in reality and syntax. Putting the current debate aside about whether college football players are amateurs or not, the reality is there are prerequisites that MUST be met in order to be declared eligible to play and receive a scholarship by the NCAA — both academic and a declaration of amateurism.

The NCAA Clearinghouse requires all Division One prospects to pass a certain amount of core courses and to meet a sliding scale of GPA combined with test scores (SAT/ACT). Note that these requirements are the floor, not the ceiling to being able to play at your dream school — meaning that a university can have higher requirements to be admitted to their institution than the NCAA’s minimum thresholds.

For foreign prospects there is even more paperwork and red tape that the prospects need to complete. If English is your second language, then you will be required to take what is known as the TOEFL test. The amateurism aspect is also going to be a longer process for foreign prospects, because some players will play in leagues where some players are paid — which may require a waiver by your club to be sent to the NCAA. **DO NOT ACCEPT ANY MONEY FOR PLAYING, as you will lose your amateur status by the NCAA***

So what does all this mean? GET OUT IN FRONT OF THE PROCESS!! There are thousands of prospects for coaches to choose from. “The best ability is dependability,” and you can’t be dependable if you are ineligible to play.

—-

Watch PPI’s website to stay up to date on NCAA eligibility. All PPI members receive personalized guidance on their eligibility application process.

More news

“He has everything we are looking for, he’s got an offer, can he come now?” asked a Division One coach about a prospect who had just started working with PPI. “Well coach, unfortunately he hadn’t submitted his information to NCAA Clearinghouse, but we made sure he sent it straight away. We advise all our prospects that this is as important as playing. We will let you know when he’s cleared,” PPI replied.

Every college football coach in America knows a story like this. They see a prospect play and know immediately that he’s a difference maker on the field for them. Then they meet the kid, they like his personality; his coach vouches for his work ethic. All are headed in the right direction, but one of the most important aspects hadn’t been checked yet. Will he be eligible?

The NCAA’s extensive eligibility rules are confusing even for American players. For international prospects, these rules are even more difficult to learn about. At PPI, we understand that we can only help someone earn a scholarship if they are going to be eligible as per the NCAA’s requirements. So it only felt fitting to kick off Chalk Talk discussing the process that enables one to chase his or her dreams.

The term college football has the word “college” in front of “football” for a reason — the school comes before the football, both in reality and syntax. Putting the current debate aside about whether college football players are amateurs or not, the reality is there are prerequisites that MUST be met in order to be declared eligible to play and receive a scholarship by the NCAA — both academic and a declaration of amateurism.

The NCAA Clearinghouse requires all Division One prospects to pass a certain amount of core courses and to meet a sliding scale of GPA combined with test scores (SAT/ACT). Note that these requirements are the floor, not the ceiling to being able to play at your dream school — meaning that a university can have higher requirements to be admitted to their institution than the NCAA’s minimum thresholds.

For foreign prospects there is even more paperwork and red tape that the prospects need to complete. If English is your second language, then you will be required to take what is known as the TOEFL test. The amateurism aspect is also going to be a longer process for foreign prospects, because some players will play in leagues where some players are paid — which may require a waiver by your club to be sent to the NCAA. **DO NOT ACCEPT ANY MONEY FOR PLAYING, as you will lose your amateur status by the NCAA***

So what does all this mean? GET OUT IN FRONT OF THE PROCESS!! There are thousands of prospects for coaches to choose from. “The best ability is dependability,” and you can’t be dependable if you are ineligible to play.

—-

Watch PPI’s website to stay up to date on NCAA eligibility. All PPI members receive personalized guidance on their eligibility application process.

More news